99: The Motive by Patrick Lencioni

99: The Motive by Patrick Lencioni
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Episode found at: https://bookworm.fm/99/

It’s time for another Patrick Lencioni leadership fable! Join Joe & Mike as they consider the responsibility of leadership, take a look at the five omissions of reward-centered leaders, and consider why they want to be leaders in the first place. Links Support the Show Joe’s Twitch Analog Joe webinars The Enneagram Mike took The…

I hope you’ll do The Advantage as an episode. It’s my favorite of his books and the one I took the most notes from (though maybe I wouldn’t have taken as many today?)

As far as The Motive, I couldn’t deny his main point about taking responsibility and serving, but like Joe, I was so disappointed that he didn’t have a framework for more types of improper motivations! Complacency was a good addition. I also wanted to hear about leaders motivated by ideology or technocratic leanings, whom I perceive can be selfless in a harmful way, and, perhaps leaders who are excessively people oriented. Maybe he would have had different categories of motivations, but regardless, the reduction to selfless/selfish leadership provoked introspection but did not provide enough for the reader to begin a complete set of self-improvements.

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I agree with @mikeschmitz that there’s a lot of good information in the end of the book that could each have their own books, however I feel it mostly dilutes the message of the whole book. When Patrick starts getting into the five omissions it gives us the shiny object and tasks that we can work on, but they’re just the five most important (or potentially just the most common) symptoms from having the wrong motive as a leader but they may not specifically apply to your situation. This is especially true if you’re not the CEO. If you have the right motive, these pieces will almost naturally take care of themselves. On that note I think the tie in to new football players and fathers was actually more meaningful and perhaps that’s because it resonated with my past experiences and where I’ve screwed up in the past by not having the right motive.

@joebuhlig, I would almost rename your middle ground as the Reluctant Leader. I agree that it exists and is probably more prevalent. I guess Reward based leadership is arguably more toxic and anyone who was forced into a leadership position and reads this book would either move toward responsibility or do their best to get out of the position in total.

Overall a good book, I wish I had recognized a lot of these pieces 15 years ago.

P.S. I really wish I had Mike’s ability to push to awkward conversations. I don’t find pushing for deep topics awkward, but criticism or situations where people’s feelings could get hurt I struggle with. And I was an instructor for a few years where that was basically my job!

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